#HireMe: Maximize Your Digital Presence During Your Job Search

Typing on laptop closeup, chatting in Facebook

The student affairs job search season is in full swing! The typical cycle for hiring for many new professional positions happens in the spring, so this is a perfect time to start reflecting on what your digital presence says about you.

Your digital presence is a significant part of your identity. Whether you use it for personal connections, professional development, or a blend of the two, who you are online can play a significant role in how you approach your job search.

Cidnye Weimer, one of the founders of the Digital Leadership Network, is in the midst of her job search process as she finishes her graduate program.  Cidnye shared some of her thoughts on how she’s integrated her digital presence into her candidate presence, and how she’s leveraged her connections to assist in her job hunt.  As an employer who regularly hires entry level professionals, I was curious to hear how Cidnye saw her digital presence interacting with her job search.

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Charlie: How have you used your social media presence in your job search?

Cidnye: I have used it in a couple of different ways:

  • Being mindful of what my bios say and what I am posting as I am aware that employers may look at them, and I want that information to be consistent with who I am as a person and my values. So, almost an extension of myself.
  • Looking at the school’s social media accounts and the people I may be working with. Based on whether or not they have accounts and also what they are posting, I am able to see more of their values come through other than what is listed on their websites. It also helps me stay up to date on events or things that are happening on their campuses!
  • I also use it to talk about building relationships with students. I talk about how I let my students follow me on every platform and this allows me to post and share their events and support them, but also allows for a personal connection if I am tweeting about something we can bond over, like current events or pop culture.

Charlie: Have you altered your presence at all leading up to the search?

Cidnye:  No, because I am always mindful of my digital presence and how it represents me so I haven’t changed anything from what I was already doing. I am always thinking about how my students will perceive what I post or share.  I also think about how my family members will perceive it, as my grandparents and a lot of other relatives follow me. So I am already always aware of my presence.

Charlie: How do you use social media in the job research process?

Cidnye: I have used hashtags like #SAgrad, #SAchat, and #SAsearch to follow tips and tricks and seek advice. I also have been personally using the hashtags #hireme and #jobsearch2k17 in a lot of my posts.

Charlie: Have you seen any major mistakes using social media as a candidate?

Cidnye: One thing that I have noticed is candidates posting in the Student Affairs Facebook group or asking on Twitter for advice about creating presentations for on-campus interviews. While I understand they are trying to prepare the best they can and want advice, I would also be conscious of the fact that your future employer could be in that group or see that Tweet and might think you can’t come up with it yourself.  It might make them view you differently. So I would ask people on your campus first and then maybe private message other professionals or ask less specific questions.

I would also say not posting specifics about your on campus or getting offered until it is officially official like a written and signed offer from both parties, and they have told you that you can announce that information, because you don’t know if they have told the other candidates yet and you want the other candidates to find out from the employer that a position has been filled and not from your social media posts.

Charlie: Any tips or tricks for others as they use social media in the search process?

Cidnye: Just know that people are ALWAYS watching! Ask yourself if your social media is authentic to who you are.  If someone met you in person would it be who they thought you were based off of social media or someone completely different? You can still have fun and be yourself on social media, but also show that you care about what is happening in the profession and how you are engaged. And look at the social media from the institution you are applying to, as well! I do that for every position I apply for.

Charlie: Thanks for your thoughts, Cidnye! Great advice for other new professionals as they approach their job search and reflect on their digital presence.

Navigating the job search process can be difficult, time-consuming, and stressful.  Don’t make your digital presence another reason for stress.  It is a privilege for many to be their authentic selves online – to not have to worry about how they look or how they identify will influence an employer’s first impression.  Find ways to “professionalize” your presence during the search for whatever that might mean for your given field – add a professional headshot, take the opportunity to share resources, engage in conversations using professional hashtags, etc.  Find ways to tap into your digital support networks, and take advantage of the strength of your digital networks to put yourself in a position to be a desirable hire for that first job!

Resources/Additional Reading:

How Social Media Can Help (Or Hurt) You in Your Job Search (via Forbes.com)

Social Media Success: A Guide for Job Seekers (via Business News Daly)

Job Search Blog Postings (via paulgordonbrown.com)

#SocialMediaSoWhite (Part 8)

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Today, Pearson checks in with her take on the discussion.   Pearson calls Memphis, Tennessee home. She is a Program Coordinator for New Student & Family Programs at Florida State University. She received her Bachelor’s in Secondary English-Education (2013) and Master’s in Higher Education/Student Personnel (2015) from the University of Mississippi. Pearson will begin her Doctor of Philosophy degree in Higher Education-Student Affairs at Florida State University in Fall 2017.

Technology has been a part of my life for the majority of my life. As a 25 y.o. Black, new professional, I identify very heavily, but also very positively and passionately, with being a millennial.

My earliest memory of technology is slightly different as I obtained by first email address when I was in middle school. My parents had divorced a few years prior and my dad was about to, for the first time in my life, move really far away. My father has been in the military my entire life so not seeing him for long periods of time due to deployment was pretty normal. But this time (perhaps due to the divorce, distance, and deployment), my mom set up an email account for me so that I could write to my dad. It was my first taste of digital messaging.

Later on, Tagged, AIM, Yahoo Messenger & MySpace emerged. By the time, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, & SnapChat emerged, there wasn’t a big learning curve for me. I knew how to use the tools, but perhaps the biggest learning curve was determining what my digital identity was going to look like. This didn’t mean much to me until, in 2012, I participated in an interview with Don Lemon on CNN where he shared my Twitter username on national television. My social media presence and digital identity took quite the turn when I was elected homecoming queen at the University of Mississippi (affectionately known as Ole Miss). Being the first (and currently only) black woman to hold this position, I received a lot of media attention (sometimes not always positive) which, in my opinion, required me to be more sensitive to my digital identity.

It wasn’t just about my digital identity and potential future employers, but more so about my family and my church. My family is huge (this is not an exaggeration)! And how I represented them was important to me. They purchased over a 100 tickets to Ole Miss’ Homecoming Game to see me. Every article, interview, magazine, etc. that I was featured in was shared and probably is still somewhere in their homes. I was also born and raised AME (African Methodist Episcopal) and was (and still am) very passionate about that identity and how I represent my God, my faith, and my church. Saint Andrew AME in Memphis, Tennessee is where I gave my life to Christ when I was 15 or 16 years old and it is still, to this day, one of my favorite places in the world.

Those are the aspects that really provide my standard operating procedures online and with technology. I learned very quickly (due to a really degrading YouTube video) that how I represent my God and my family was all I cared about and regardless of how much effort I put into my digital identity, much would be left to interpretation as well as criticism. I think that’s what makes my digital media use authentic.

As a professional of color, it’s really important for me to be authentic in all spaces. I realized just how authentic my digital media presence was when I transitioned to Florida State. New to my position, I did not talk a lot and to some students my vernacular made it appear that I was “not woke” (aka “You talk white”–but that’s an issue for another day). When this particular student followed me a Twitter though, he pronounced me as “radical” the next time he saw me. My views aligned with many of his own and my engagement in Black Twitter was genuine. I shared stories of injustice and privilege while also contributing to the comedic nature that is often embedded within Black Twitter. Since then our relationship has been dramatically different. His level of comfort to discuss his identity and his experience increased. His desire to gain my opinion and advice heightened. It was interesting because he didn’t allow my skin color to immediately determine his comfortability. My twitter feed was vetted first. While I think my actual voice is the same in person as it is on twitter, he was able to decipher something different in that digital space. He was able to learn a lot about me without asking a lot of questions. That’s how that relationship was established and really that’s how it continues to develop. My students favorite and retweet a lot of my feed and I am cognizant of what that means. Mirroring how I navigate these spaces could be how they are learning to navigate their digital identity.

However, I do think that the level of authenticity depends on the platform. On twitter, it is easy to retweet someone’s 140-character response that I agree with. However, on Facebook, I am much more intentional. Because Facebook tends to have lengthier articles—I use caution before I just share an article. Did I read the whole article? Do I holistically agree with everything in the article?

As I navigate social media as a young, black, and new professional, I often find that I am at a crossroads. Because I share a lot on social media, I unfairly have that expectation of others. Because of the heightened climate in our country, I wonder (again, unfairly) that if you’re not speaking out against the injustices, do you care? Do you know? Are you even attempting to understand? I constantly have to remind myself (for the sake of others and myself) that while social media is a great platform for sharing injustices, that we can also share trivial things. It’s okay to post a funny story, something related to pop culture, or a fun trip I went on. It doesn’t mean that I (or anyone else) has forgotten or is overlooking the world’s injustices. It means that we can do both—we have the capacity to denounce something inhumane and share that really funny meme.

But at the same time, there are barriers and limitations to how I navigate social media. There are articles that are sent to me or I send privately because white fragility is real. But in the same breath, so is black pain. I am 100% comfortable sharing an article about the unjust killing of a black man or child, but when it comes to sharing the Root’s 2016: Wypipo Awards, I hold back. I haven’t discovered why yet.

One of my favorite tweeters, Blair Imani (@BlairImani) once tweeted, “If being vocal about injustice will tarnish your career, it is a career worth pursuing.”

I hold on to this sentiment very strongly when I am engaging in social media and while my family and my faith provide my standard operating procedures, this statement is also my foundation when I consider my standard operating procedure for social media as it relates to my profession.

Pearson’s social media:

  • Twitter, Instagram: @pearson_ality
  • Facebook: Pearson Person
  • Pearson’s LinkedIn
  • Pearson’s Blog

 

#SocialMediaSoWhite (Part 7)

A lot has already been written about tone policing.  If you are unfamiliar, start here.  In reading the blogs in this #SocialMediaSoWhite series so far, I am struck with the amount of effort it takes to consider ones digital identity when the color of your skin impacts your practice.  I have mostly been unaware of the impact this has had on my colleagues as I navigate my own digital space.

In addition to being a student affairs practitioner, I am also discovering my own internal journey to deal with my own emotions.  As a man, growing up, I was told to fight my emotions.  Like Spock from Star Trek, I was told Logic wins the day.  If you make a good point, you don’t need emotions to win.

Well, being married for the past (almost) 15 years, logic doesn’t always work when it comes to relationships.  When I say something that hurts others, and they share that hurt with me, I have some choices to make.  When my significant other comes to me and shares that something I said or did hurt them, and I don’t believe what I said or did should have hurt them, I have a few options to respond:

  • Argue with them and convince them they are wrong for feeling hurt by my actions.  Explain what I did was actually the right course of action and explain if only they had understood my intent or had better facts, they would not have been hurt by my actions. I would make a logical argument and they would, of course, see that I was right and their feelings would no longer be hurt.
  • I can call them a snowflake and tell them to toughen up. I can tell them they need a thicker skin.
  • I can throw my own belief out the window and just accept what they are saying is true.
  • I can listen to them with empathy.  Don’t argue or try to solve the problem in that moment.  Think about my behavior, action, or words, and determine whether I am ok repeating that behavior and having them continue to be hurt, or whether I should change my behavior so that I avoid the hurt in the future

Now, consider my first response above.  Let’s now imagine every time I say something that hurts my significant other, and they confront me, this was my response.  At what point would it make sense for them to get angry?  When someone continues to hurt you, and doesn’t seem to care that they hurt you, we could understand the anger, right?

So imagine the 100th time this interaction occurs and I hurt them.  They respond out of anger.  And my response is “whoa whoa whoa!  Why are you so angry?  Ya know, you’d be more effective if you were calm in how you confronted me!  You catch more flies with honey!”

THIS IS TONE POLICING.  Except on the interwebs it is happening on a broader scale, and our colleagues of color continue to communicate that they are hurt by our actions, and we continue to respond in every way above EXCEPT empathy.

So when someone shares with me that they are hurt by systemic power and white privilege, AND they express that hurt in a way that is angry I have a few options:

  • Argue with them and tell them they are wrong, and argue how we are all the same, or actually class is a bigger deal than race, and if they understood the research they would see it my way
  • I can tell them to suck it up – people are successful regardless of the color of their skin
  • Throw my own belief out the window and just accept what people are saying is true
  • Listen to them with empathy.  Decide whether I want to change my behavior to avoid future hurts. Decide to look to dismantle systems I am a part of.

I’d argue one of those options is likely better towards harmony.  But here is the secret;  our colleagues aren’t wrong.  If anything, this blog series should communicate the impact the color of one’s skin has on their practices as a Student Affairs professionals.  The bigger question to my white, cisgender, heterosexual colleagues is “what are WE going to do about it?”  We are the ones who created the problem.  We need to lead the way in fixing it.  We cannot put the responsibility on those negatively impacted to fix the system WE BUILT.  We built the system to give our children an advantage.  Our children look a certain way.  You can argue things may be “better” now, but they are NOT equitable.  Here is the (literal) million dollar question – are we ready to sacrifice the advantages we have built into the system (for the benefit of our children) so that OTHERS can succeed?  That is what we need to wrestle with.

#SocialMediaSoWhite (Part 6)

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For today’s blog, Crystal Lay weighs in on her experiences with social media.  Crystal is an Assistant Director of Residential Education at UC Berkeley.  Her life motto is God first, family second and career third.  She has been in residential life for 15+ years.  Crystal’s professional passion areas include Residential Curriculum, Social Justice and Inclusion, and Professional Development.  When she isn’t working she enjoys spending time with her husband Jake and their two children, cooking, and traveling. You can find more of her writings at https://clayonlineblog.wordpress.com/

Capture

What You See Is What You Get

I am very selective with how I manage my facebook profile and postings. Very rarely do I post anything publicly.  Very rarely do I post anything unsavory in my status updates. When it comes to who gets to be a part of my facebook world; I usually only add people who I have met in person which includes family, former colleagues and students, and folks who I have met at conferences.  Generally I post things about my family and my values, along with the occasional memes and political rants.  There are times when I post more personal things out of wanting to vent or wanting prayer or advice.  When you look at my page I think it is safe to see what my values, priorities and passions are; what you see is what you get.  I am very comfortable with my online presence. If you have a question about what I have posted I am fully prepared to respond.

I remember the saying, “if you do not want anyone to know it, don’t write it down”.  I also remember being asked the question, “would you say that in front of your Grandmother?”  I use these things to guide most of the things I do in my life.  I am also finding that I use this when it comes to how I manage my social media presence. I think my brain is on automatic filter because it wasn’t until I began writing this that I realized how this factors into my facebook presence.  I am also a Mother and I think about what would I want my kids to think of the things I am saying.  And lastly as an Administrator, a black Administrator, what example will I set. So, today I feel pretty good just being me; a black Christian Mom who is an administrator who is comfortable in her skin.  I also think being myself has come from being at the point in my career and my life where I am confident.  I know that I do good work and I also know that worrying and stressing over what people think of me is unhealthy.  Don’t get me wrong, I need my job!  I have a family to support BUT my wellness is tied into pleasing God and taking care of my family.  When I go to work I remind myself that I work for God.  I use the phrasing, S.T.O.P;  Spirit Take Over Please, before I enter situations where things may be difficult because like I said, I need my job.

You see I used to live my life differently.  I was told that I had to walk better, talk better, and dress better than Whites.  I was told that I needed to work twice as hard.  These are the messages that I received for quite some time.  In my workplace I noticed several things that reinforced that idea.  I got a masters and that wasn’t enough, then I got a second masters, nope.  Then I started my Ph.D. because I was told that I would then get a bigger seat at the table.  But it seemed I did all these things and I felt incomplete. As a Black women, who at times identifies as Multiracial, I am very aware of the fact that my tone or my facial expressions somehow mean something different than when my white counterparts speak.  My tone can be perceived as angry, aggressive or as challenging.  Early on in my career my evaluations from my students would say, she is unapproachable or aggressive.  Somehow I was always the problem.  When did asking someone to do their job or providing them with feedback become a problem?   I remember crying in my office after several evaluations.  I remembered the evaluation where my staff said that I talked about race too much.  I addressed the issue with my staff but that wouldn’t be the last time or staff.  I also began to notice how I was often confused with the other black woman in the office.  This has happened at 3 different institutions whether it be through face to face name mix ups or receiving each other’s mail.  And then there are the parents who wanted to speak to someone above me and you could see the relief whenever my supervisor was white.

When I read posts on social media where folks voice their frustrations, confusion, and pain; I get it.  I have had facebook since 2005 and I have watched it turn into a place where folks share everything.  At the time I did not post things, that I can recall, on facebook about the racist things that were happening to me but  I found ways to turn it into an article or I would send it out to a listserv to folks who would get it and me.  I did not think that me speaking my mind or sharing my experiences would equal me not getting a job.  Or that employers would question my emotional intelligence or professional maturity.  At some point I realized that yes, it could have an impact and I had to be okay with that.  And guess what?  I was and I knew that if I had a story to tell then it had better be founded and worth a listen.  I began to think about data, experiences, and also solutions.  The average person struggles when there are problems listed but no solutions.  I became a part of people of color focus groups and we were focused on addressing the issues and concerns.  But the one thing that was constant was the awareness that there could be consequences for our actions.

I want there to be space to share our experiences and our voices.  Safe spaces to really be who we are should and need to exist.  Social media can be that place but know that one of the risks of showing up authentically is people may not like us. People may not want to hear us BUT that is about them; not us.  We may be put on a “blacklist,” but there is more than one list.  On my list I remember that people make rookie mistakes and I also remember that there are some people who are sharing their stories about being marginalized, oppression.  There are people who are tired of feeling defeated and unheard and they are desperate for hope and for action.
The sad and unfortunate reality is that there will be a different set of consequences for brown people.  The stakes are different.  Some people aren’t ready to deal with all that comes with my black face.  I love my black face.  I love being myself.  I own my words and my actions.  It took some failures, some reporting, and a whole lot of courage to take off my mask.  So, please just remember that you need to be able to own what you have said and to be prepared for folks to ask for an explanation.

 

To see more, please click here for the full series

#SocialMediaSoWhite (Part 5)

Once again, I wanted to share thoughts on my white perspective of this issue:

In thinking about Digital Leadership, there are some concepts I wanted to bring to light in order to dismantle the systems at work that keep white, privileged colleagues in their comfort zones and marginalize other voices:

One concept I have written about already at length is the concept of racism itself.  As a white kid growing up, I learned at a very early age that racism meant looking at the color of one’s skin.  As long as I didn’t see others as being “different” I was protected from being labeled a “racist.” We (as white kids growing up in the suburbs) were taught that Martin Luther King’s “I Have a Dream” speech was critical because of this very important line:

“I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character.”

What I was taught about MLK was this; if I look at someone’s skin color, I am judging them by the color of their skin.  I need to IGNORE skin color and look past that so I can see what is inside them.

Sit with that for a moment.  That SOUNDS great on the surface, doesn’t it?  I mean, better than the alternative of judging someone to be “less than” because their skin color was different than mine.  That seems like a great place to start in teaching kids not to be racist.  The problem is I was never challenged to go beyond this view of racism until much later in life.  And, we have a society of white people who have remained stuck in “I am a racist if I see skin color” mentality.

The impact of this?  I don’t see how people are treated differently based on the color of their skin.  I ignore any data given to me that tells me people are treated differently based on their skin color.  What this does is wipe out hundreds of years of lived experience.  It would be like Germans in 1950 Germany saying “I don’t see Jewish people.  I treat Jewish people exactly the same as those who subjugated the Jews and put them in concentration camps!”  I say this, As. A. Jew.  To ignore race in America is to ignore the lived experiences of those who are not white and make the oppressor morally equivalent to the oppressed.

How does this translate to Social Media?  We ignore race in our social media conversations.  When an issue comes up (for example on Facebook) and someone makes a controversial comment or post and most of the white professionals react one way, and most of the black professionals react completely different, we don’t stop for a moment and say to ourselves “Hm.  There are two sides of reactions here.  One side is mostly a group of professionals who we recognized as having marginalized/oppressed identities.  The other side is mostly a group of professionals with privileged/oppressor identities.  MAYBE those two sides aren’t morally equivalent?”  Instead those with power and privilege look and say “I guess the issue isn’t settled – we will just have to agree to disagree.”

This is problematic because it keeps power and privilege in comfort as opposed to challenging and making people uncomfortable and motivating change.  If we are going to grow the knowledge base of digital leadership, we need to include social justice lenses when engaging in digital leadership work.

 

#SocialMediaSoWhite (Part 4)

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Before you begin, if you are new to this series, please read the introduction blog here.

For today’s blog, Ashlee Roberts, the Assistant Director in the Office of Student Involvement at the University of Missouri-St. Louis weighs in on her experiences navigating social media:

How do I navigate social media? Somewhat carefully and somewhat openly. I operate from the space that being connected on social media doesn’t mean we’re friends, so I will engage socially but keep many things for people who I know in real life and/or have built personal connections. I have a Facebook and two Twitter accounts. I’ve seen some [white] professionals comment on the inauthenticity of having two accounts, but in considering how I navigate social media as a black professional, those two accounts are best for me. I initially started with a single Twitter account. Facebook is my most personal use of social media. That’s a space where I share my family, friends, and professional life. It’s a conversion of all of me. I can’t say that I operate on that platform differently than my white colleagues. I rarely, if ever, add professionals with whom I’ve not built a rapport, as friends, regardless of their race. I am mindful of the things I say and do in regards to reputation, but that mostly shows up in how I operate in professional groups. I typically show up as a helper-I’ll share opportunities, advice, or insight where it’s fitting, but I don’t see the groups at-large as my friends so I don’t really indulge in being snarky or shady. I’m sarcastic and no-nonsense in person, but online, I mostly abide by my mama’s life advice that I don’t I have to say everything I’m thinking. Plus, I have friends and colleagues who I know offline with whom I can vent and make snarky commentary, if I feel so compelled.

As I thought of this topic, that idea of “digital codeswitching” came to mind. Twitter is where I switch it up and have two accounts. Once upon a time, I had a single Twitter account. I reluctantly created an account shortly after I graduated and was applying/waiting for a job. As it goes when most people initially join Twitter, I only had a few followers and offered random musings. I knew most of the people who followed me, including three white professionals with whom I worked closely and knew from grad school. I probably posted a couple of times on Facebook sharing that I have an account. Even though I only had like 30 followers, my account was locked because I was on the job search. I eventually learned how that reduced my engagement with people, so I opened it. Fast forward to a year and half into professional life and one of my [black] students followed me. I blocked her and kept it moving. I’m not really crass or vulgar on social media, but it felt as if my personal space had been infringed upon and I wanted some separation from work.

As I gained more followers and engaged more with “Black Twitter,” I didn’t feel like I could wholly be myself with white SA pros who I don’t personally know, so that, coupled with the potential of students following me, prompted me to make a professional account. I also don’t know my “Black Twitter” followers like that and didn’t want to explicitly share about my career, especially as I grew to know more people in my city, closing the degrees of separation between me and my students (this was also critical to me as a professional who was barely older than my students).

On my personal account, I can tweet a Yo Gotti lyric or line from The Players Club comfortably and know someone will finish it for me. I also don’t have to concern myself with my character being negatively judged because I indulge in entertainment with heavy themes of misogyny, drug use, etc. On my professional account I give a glimpse into my musical preferences, but it’s to a lesser degree. I still display my personality and share my non-work interests and happenings, but I don’t feel compelled to share much of the aspects of my “ratchet” side. I do think I’d be judged harshly and that those things could overshadow other aspects of my character with white professionals, especially. Black tax is real.

No one taught or instructed me on how to navigate social media and I’ve not read much on it, but I do present to student organizations about the topic. I’m a naturally guarded person and while I’m naturally helpful and want to see people win, I’ve never been concerned about being Miss Popular or having a ton of friends. Considering that, I honestly don’t feel suppressed in this decision to have two accounts, though, because everyone in the world doesn’t need to know everything about me. If they have the pleasure to meet me in person, they’ll likely learn those things about me, but I don’t feel like I have to give anyone all of me to be an authentic person or professional.

#SocialMediaSoWhite (Part 3)

Once again, I want to share my thoughts on this conversation and provide you what I have been chewing on as a White, Cisgender, Heterosexual Man.  If you are new to this blog, you can start with this here:

I think what has hit me most in thinking about Digital Leadership and Social Media competencies is just how steeped in privilege and power they are.  We often talk about white systemic power and privilege being grounded in the past, but when it comes to Social Media, the white system is being built in real time.  From a very macro level, the talent pool being lifted and extolled as experts on social media is very white.  I am aware of colleagues of color doing good work on social media and leadership, but they are often ignored when selecting leaders to train and educate us as a field.  Rarely are they asked to speak at national conferences or lead summits on social media work.  Also, I am starting to notice a lack of diversity when it comes to those of us doing marketing work in student affairs.

We default to leaders to train us who make us feel comfortable about ourselves – that means looking for white, cisgender, heterosexual men and women who are developing the knowledge base and areas of expertise.  In turn, this gives power to these groups and maintains the system of power and privilege in our field.  Instead we need to be looking at ways to dismantle white power and privilege when it comes to social media and digital leadership.

Some things I have seen develop that reinforce the privilege:

  • A very white, cisgender, heterosexual privileged view of authenticity. We talk a lot in digital leadership about being your “true self.”  But for many of our colleagues, being their “true self” could hurt their careers.
    • On many campuses (specifically faith based private colleges) you could get fired for being gay. How authentic can our colleagues who work on these campuses be on social media?
    • In our field, being “nice” is vaunted as an ideal trait for professionals. As someone who deals with micro and macro aggressions on a regular basis, how “authentic” can our colleagues be if they are authentically angry?
    • In our field, mental health issues are taboo. If a professional colleague were struggling with mental health issues like depression, how “authentic” can they be on social media if they are truly struggling?
    • In our field, being “professional” has a very distinct connotation rooted in white cisgender power and privilege. As someone with privilege, it is a LOT easier for me to be my authentic self and be given a pass when I may do something “outside the norm.”  I am looked at as “quirky” or “edgy” but it probably won’t hurt my career. Conversely, someone who crosses gender binary lines in how they indentify and/or dress could be hurt in their careers as being “unprofessional.”
  • It takes time to be on social media.  I can be on social media at work as a white professional, and no one is going to question my competency as a professional.  Being on social media while doing my job actually makes me a better professional because of what I learn and I am able to bring back to my campus to educate others.  But can other colleagues who aren’t given the same presumptions about their competency do the same?
    • Also, because I am white, often times less is required of me on my campus to be perceived as competent. This allows me more time to “do” social media.  If I had to work harder to maintain perceptions of competency, I am less able to engage on social media and therefore might have less time to contribute to the knowledge base.

So with this, what do I do?  How do I work to dismantle privilege when it comes to social media leadership?  I listen. I challenge.  I lift voices of those marginalized to make sure my other white (privileged) colleagues are listening.  I speak to those with power and ask them to consider these concepts in the decisions they make around social media.

More to come on this topic from me and others.

 

#SocialMediaSoWhite (Part 2)

Dismantling Power and Privilege in Social Media Spaces

rhett

In our first official post of our series (see introduction here), we’ve asked Rhett Burden to weigh in on this topic of Social Media spaces as a black professional. Rhett currently serves as an Assistant Director of Residence Life with Campus Living Villages in San Francisco. He is also an author, speaker, entrepreneur, and activist. His children’s books can be found at Royally Melanated (www.royallymelanated.com)

This is what Rhett has to say on the subject:

As a member of several personal, professional and scholastic social media pages and groups, I’ve learned to govern my engagement under the principle of speaking “truth to power.” My ultimate goal is to learn from those in the digital media space that are wiser than I, share marginalized perspectives and to boldly and unapologetically speak my mind on social issues that impact my community. I also remain cognizant of my position and perspective by filtering who can see my comments as I compartmentalize friends, family, and colleagues under several different categories.

Authenticity is exceedingly important as I navigate social spaces. As a life-long learner, I want to ready, study and be under the tutelage of media organizations, scholars and thought leaders who have journalistic and professional integrity. Erudition from honest media and individual sources allows me to circumnavigate their space which propels the message I share to my audience. As a professional of color, I believe it’s my obligation to honestly, sincerely and unapologetically speak up for my community, the melanoid community. I believe as long as I share my ideals and sentiments on my personal platform and do not force them on colleague’s pages or shared spaces, the moral high ground is with me.

I learned to navigate digital spaces from trial and error. Understanding my digital footprint has come from making mistakes, intruding on other’s platforms and engaging too quickly in digital dialogue that I was not equipped to take part in. Social media provides the endless platform for growth, critique, and humility. Whenever I engage young professionals in social media management, I always advise they follow three simple rules:

  1. If you have an opinion where you have no responsibility, proceed with caution
  2. Know your audience
  3. Thoroughly understand what you choose to engage in

The largest difference that I notice (between white professionals and black professionals)  while navigating social media spaces is my ability to engage in and support pro-black rhetoric, movements and actions while simultaneously having to be mindful of the fragility most of my white counterparts have in their ability to openly express or support, varying narratives. There is a huge disparity in what black professionals can and cannot support based on the university you work at, colleagues you engage with and impact you have on social.

The barriers and challenges that I face (on social media) most often because of my identity are:

  • Tokenism
  • The “Black Tax” – The notion that black people have to work and perform regular task twice as well as their white counterparts
  • Establishing mentor based relationship with fellow black professionals. There are too few of us in the professional ecosystem.

I navigate those challenges by being well-read and studied, connecting with allies and compartmentalizing certain components of my professional life and day.

It’s important for young professionals to find groups, pages and colleagues that share their values and relish open dialogue. I would encourage new professionals to network, build mastermind groups with like-minded professionals and engage in honest and direct dialogue about workplace culture and their comfort level.

Young professionals have questions and it’s my hope that weathered- professionals will take the opportunity to digitally give back to the profession. I encourage them to make mistakes and fail forward. Missteps will occur when operating digital platforms, its ok. Learn from the circumstance, language and feelings portrayed and move on. So much happens on social daily that mistakes are quickly overshadowed by the next hot topic.

#SocialMediaSoWhite (Introduction)

Greetings!  As we explore this journey of Social Media and Digital Leadership, I was struck recently when I received an advertisement for a prominent Higher Education Social Media Conference.  There were 12 speakers at this online conference, and when I looked at the advertisement I was surprised at the lack of racial diversity among their panelists.  In addition, as we approach March 25, 2017; the one year anniversary of the #BLKSAPBlackout on the Student Affairs Facebook page, I wanted to engage with colleagues about the concept of digital leadership and social media through a lens of equity and inclusion.

Questions came to my head regarding who is gaining power in our field when it comes to Social Media leadership and whether the knowledge base currently being researched, discussed, and transferred to Senior Student Affairs Officers was truly inclusive of all experiences, or whether the knowledge was being couched and framed within white privilege and power.  We began to explore this concept with various colleagues and have asked some to write on their experiences as black professionals who use social media. It is our hope this expands the knowledge and resources out there in how social media is used by various people groups who may not identify as white, cisgender, heterosexual and male.  In addition, we desire to honor the important gift given to us as white professionals on the facebook page a year ago with the #BLKSAPBlackout.  We have put together a few slides to highlight just some of the knowledge shared on the page, but we would encourage you to check out the entire conversation – just search for #BLKSAPBlackout on the Student Affairs Professionals Facebook page

In engaging black professionals on this topic, we asked the following questions for exploration:

  • What are some of your standard operating procedures when it comes to social media and how you engage?
  • What role does “authenticity” play in how you navigate social media? Among the research, authenticity seems to play a prominent role.  How do you navigate this as a professional of color?
  • How did you learn to navigate social media? Were there missteps you made and how do we train young professionals to learn from your mistakes?
  • What can we do to teach young professionals about how to be digital leaders and engage in social media in a way that enhances their career?
  • What differences do you see in how you, as a black professional, navigate social media spaces than your white counter parts?
  • What barriers and challenges do you face because of your identity?
  • How do you navigate those challenges, and what could new professionals do to navigate them to learn from your knowledge and wisdom?

These were merely prompts, as we asked colleagues to take this where they felt led.  It is our hope these writings over the next few weeks will enlighten and engage in the topic of power and privilege within social media.

At the same time, I wanted to explore where my privilege and power was blinding me from being inclusive in my social media practice.  Where could I dismantle the power and privilege we already have in a relatively new communication system?  I explored tone policing, the erasing of race from our worldview as white people, and the concept of impact vs. intent.  It is our hope this series will engage, create discussion, and produce a much richer field for exploration in the world of Digital Leadership.

If you’d like to add to this discussion in an official capacity, we would love to include your voice!  Feel free to email tyler and we can get you set up to add to the series.

Read Part 2 Here

Read Part 3 Here

Read Part 4 Here

Read Part 5 Here

Read Part 6 Here

Read Part 7 Here

Read Part 8 Here

Being a Chick in Cyberspace

*A note from the author. I write this as a cisgender white woman. This post reflects some experiences and statistics of other female gender-identified users.

I write this post in light of women’s history month, which in preparation got me thinking about the unique experiences that women and girls experience especially in digital spaces. Digital communities have afforded me many networking, branding and outreach opportunities – but not without drawbacks.

Being a chick online can rock – it can also be rough.

This post shares some of these tough circumstances, but also will leave you with way more resources, communities and tools for empowerment in virtual spaces.

This past year we have seen examples of women, especially on Twitter harassed such as Ella Dawson, Dana Schwartz, and Leslie Jones. I know there are countless others. I dare you to read the comments on their Twitter feeds: from comfortable support to complete shock.

In the fall Twitter rolled out a new harassment reporting tool. As the Twitter blog details,

“The amount of abuse, bullying, and harassment we’ve seen across the Internet has risen sharply over the past few years. These behaviors inhibit people from participating on Twitter, or anywhere. Abusive conduct removes the chance to see and share all perspectives around an issue, which we believe is critical to moving us all forward. In the worst cases, this type of conduct threatens human dignity, which we should all stand together to protect.”

Abuse can be seen and experienced across the digital landscape. In 2014, Pew Research Center published a harassment study finding that 70% of adults have observed online harassment and 40% have personally experienced harassment online.

Examples include being called offensive names (27%), someone purposefully embarrassing them (22%), physically threatened (8%), Stalked (8%), harassment over time (7%) and sexual harassment (6%). Age increased these statistics, with 18-29 reporting harassment at 65% (Pew, 2014).

When looking at gender, men were more likely to be called names but by far women, especially those 18-29, had experienced severe harassment including sexual harassment and stalking. The other main difference between men and women is what Pew reports as, “they (women) do not escape the heightened rates of physical threats and sustained harassment common to their male peers and young people in general” (Pew, 2014).

I have had two major experiences with online harassment. The first was a YouTube video that used my name along with a number of expletives, including calling me names that started with “b” and “c.” Interesting enough, some high-profile YouTubers had also received this same video. I reported the video, and the account and the entire channel was deleted within a day. But by far, most of my struggles have been on Twitter.

Twitter Troubles

The other experience continues to happen, as my Twitter account has been ‘stolen’ or impersonated over 200 times. At one point there were 50 of me on Twitter. Thankfully, these accounts haven’t tweeted anything offensive and going through Twitter’s (slow) reporting process will eventually get them taken down.

Twitter’s new tool allows users to take back their accounts, not just reporting users but the ability to block harassing words, phrases or entire conversations. This is not a new idea – as YouTube settings allow for similar filtering.

What hopefully will re-focus Twitter’s efforts acting on harassment comes from the new hateful conduct policy that, “prohibits specific conduct that targets people by race, ethnicity, national origin, sexual orientation, gender, gender identity, religious affiliation, age, disability, or disease.” If you report a tweet or user under this policy, it goes to the top to be reviewed.

But how bad can it really get? There are countless stories to share, but the most recent that got public attention – including causing Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey to respond directly involved Leslie Jones.

Twitter is known for having a troll problem, accounts that only seek to harass users and stir up controversy. The peak of Leslie Jones harassments came at the release of Ghostbusters late summer. Tweets that mentioned or were directed at her called her a primate, included pornography, resulted in the production of fake Leslie Jones accounts that tweeted hate, and more. One user, in particular, Milo Yiannopolouls – part of GamerGate who is known to support harassment of women – took to Twitter to attack Jones.

Yiannopoulos reacted with even more ammunition. One tweet calling her “barely literate.”

Leslie Jones supporters fired back, using hashtags just as #LoveforLeslieJ.

Even educators reached out to Jones. Amma Marfo, a prolific tweeter, writer, podcaster and leadership speaker posted the following:

Amma describes what transpired next, “I came to her defense with a tweet about how I loved that she was strong, but she shouldn’t have to be- people should be nicer. It got WAY more attention than I expected. Lots of re-tweets, likes, and messages of agreement came in, but lots of vitriol and hate came with it. I was called naive, stupid, unrealistic, and told to shut up…and those are just the comments that are fit to print.”

She went on to share,

“Insults were hurled at me based on gender, but also based on race. The deluge became so unsustainable that I had to activate the Quality Control mechanism that Twitter had deployed only days before. I appreciated it for the peace and space it created, but it does make interacting in that space different from how I used to.

Finally, Amma reflected, “Quality control only allows you to see responses from people you follow- which is a nice way to reduce noise but also limits my ability to find new people who may have found their way to my feed via a friend or other referral. Further, it quiets dissent in an odd way. I don’t want to exist in the sort of echo chamber that a Quality Control filter creates, I just want people to be civil and constructive. And for standing up for a fellow woman creator, I lost the ability to make that distinction.”

The quality control filter that Twitter implemented still exists, but like Amma’s original tweet beckons, “Terrible people should stop being terrible.

Milo ended up being banned from Twitter – as many alt-right/white supremacy accounts have since. Twitter received both praise and criticism for this.

Laura Pasquini, Lecturer in Learning Technologies in the College of Information at the University of North Texas and Researcher with The Digital Learning and Social Media Research Group at Royal Roads University, shared another detailed example to Leslie Jones and #GamerGate. She shared how Twitter trolls took over, “who thought it was great to flame me way too early in the morning before having my coffee.”

She went on to state that, “I think it is something we need to talk about and bring awareness about, particularly since some of us work in areas where trolling and attacks happen for work and research.” She shared a fantastic guide called the Best Practices for Conducting Risky Research and Protecting Yourself from Online Harassment.

Taking Back Tools for Chicks in Cyberspace

The likelihood of being a chick in cyberspace, and encountering harassment are real. What I find that keeps me engaged are people and organizations that use those same tools to bring women together.

For example, Laura Pasquini is also a founder of a fantastic podcast, #3Wedu: Women Who Wine in Education. The show is described as, “designed to uncork ideas and thoughts of what is happening with women in education.” They chat about barriers, mentorship, recognition, leadership, mentorship and empowerment all over the delight of a glass of wine.

More and more of these positive examples are “pouring” in across the interwebs. Below lists a few, but I have started a google doc to crowdsource even more. Please jump on and add even more!

No matter your gender identity – everyone deserves to be treated as a whole person, both physical or virtual locations. With statistics rising of bullying of all kinds, I implore you to take action especially if you see harassment happening to someone and report the behavior if it is happening to you. Watch out for your fellow cyber chicks.

Twitter, the company, can only do so much. It has to be the collection of users that want to take back the tool for real constructive dialogue and experiences to make a lasting impact.

Duggan, M. (2014). Online Harassment. Retrieved from http://www.pewinternet.org/2014/10/22/online-harassment/


Resources

Non-Education Specific 
  • Digital Communities

Amy Poehler Smart Girls

Summer Virtual Connection Circle – Facebook Group

The Lady Project

Girl Boss – Twitter Page

I am That Girl – Twitter Page

Girls on the Run

Malala Fund – Twitter Page

Women for Women International – Twitter

Women in the World 

  • Hashtags

#GirlBoss

#GirlLove

#FanGirlFriday

Women 2.0

#ladyboss

#ActuallySheCan

#SheMeansBusiness

#womenwholead

#EverydaySexism

#EffYourBeautyStandards

#ThisGirlCan

#SmartGirlsAsk

#SheInspiresMe

#WomeninStem

#WomeninTech

#BlackGirlsAreMagic/#BlackGirlMagic

#AskHerMore

#ILookLikeAnEngineer

#LikeALadyDoc

#InternationalWomensDay

#NoWomanEver

#YesAllWomen

  • Podcasts

Call Your Girlfriend

The Imposters

Girl Boss Radio

Black Girls Talking

Women of the Hour

The Guilty Feminist

Rocket

Stuff Mom Never Told You

  • Organizations

Women 2.0

She Started It

Her Agenda

National Organization for Women

Actually She Can

Boss Babe

National Council for Research on Women

Feminist.com

National Women’s History Project

Movemeant Foundation

Women for Women International

Keep a Breast Foundation

International Women’s Forum

Higher Education Pro Specific

  • Digital Communities

#3Wedu Podcast: Women Who Wine in Education

Women’s Leadership Institute Participants & Friends – Facebook Group

ACUHO-I Women in Housing Network – Facebook Group

NASPA – WISA Women in Student Affairs – Facebook Page

African American Women in Higher Education – Facebook Page

Oregon Women in Higher Education – Facebook Page

Women in Higher Education – Facebook Page

Higher Education Resource Services (HERS) – Facebook Page

ACPA – Coalition for Women Identities – Facebook Page

Women of Color in Student Affairs – Facebook Page

  • Organizations/Conferences for Higher Ed Professionals

Women’s Leadership Institute

American Association University Women

NASPA WISA KC

ACPA Coalition for Women Identities

Manicur Symposium

Advancing Women

Women Leaders in College Sports

National Asian American Pacific Women’s Forum

International Leadership Association (ILA) – Women & leadership Affinity Group

AAWCC: American Association for Women in Community College

The Institute for Research on Women & Gender (IRWG), University of Michigan Office of Research

  • College Student Women Digital Communities

Students Stand with Malala

Girls in Tech – Twitter

Girls Who Code – Twitter

Girls Incorporated

Movemeant Foundation – Twitter

She’s The First Campus Organization

#STFcampus

#GirlsinTech

#GirlsinStem

#STFcampus

  • Organizations/Conferences for college student women

AAUW’s National Conference for College Women Student Leaders

Actually She Can

She’s the First

Girls Write Now